old pictures of Indonesia

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October 29, 2014

October 25, 2014

Photos of Javanese Woman

Javanese Woman
Javanese Woman

Young Javanese Woman by Kassian Cephas 1845-1912 c. 1885
Young Javanese Woman by Kassian Cephas 1845-1912 c. 1885

Young Javanese Woman
Young Javanese Woman

A lirong woman (Kalimantan) of the Tinjar river

A lirong woman (Kalimantan) of the Tinjar river 1912

A lirong woman (Klemantan) of the Tinjar river. The lobe of the ear of Kayan and Kenyah women is pierced at an early age. When the lobe has been distended to below the collar-bone, the weight on each ear is as two and a half pounds. | From: Buschan, Georg (1900): Die Sitten der Völker, Vol. I, plate 260, page 217. "The Pagan Tribes of Borneo" photo: Charles Hose, 1912. Customs of the World ca. 1912

Raden Saleh

Raden Saleh, The Greatest Painter from Dutch East Indies period

Raden Saleh Sjarif Boestaman (1811 - April 23, 1880) was an Indonesian Romantic painter of Javanese ethnicity who pioneered modern Indonesian art. He was considered to be the first modern artist from Indonesia (then Dutch East Indies), and his paintings corresponded with nineteenth-century romanticism which was popular in Europe at the time. He also expressed his cultural roots and inventiveness in his work.

Village at West Java


Village at West Java ~ Indonesia - Years unknown
Village at West Java ~ Indonesia - Years unknown

Village at West Java ~ Indonesia - Years unknown


Soekawati Temple - 1920

Temple Soekawati - T Weissenborn - Indonesia 1920

Rice Transport in Bali - 1920

Rice Transport in Bali - Indonesia 1920s by Thilly Weissenborn
Rice Transport in Bali - Indonesia 1920s by Thilly Weissenborn

Taking the Oath

Taking the Oath - Bali - Indonesia ~ 1920s
Taking the Oath - Bali - Indonesia ~ 1920s by Thilly Weissenborn

October 24, 2014

Pasar Ikan ~ Jakarta 1915

Batavia Pasar Ikan Fish Market Java Indonesia 1915
Batavia Pasar Ikan Fish Market Java Indonesia 1915

China Town

Picture of Batavia Chinatown on the rain - Java Indonesia ca 1915


In Batavia (now Jakarta), Dutch colonialism created commercial opportunities which attracted immigrants from many areas of what is now Indonesia. This economic activity also lured thousands of Chinese people to Java. Swift immigration challenged the city's limited infrastructure and created burdens on the city. Tensions grew as the colonial government tried to restrict Chinese migration through deportations.

Batavia Glodok 1915
Glodok 1915
Glodok 1910
Glodok 1910

October 23, 2014

Batak Woman with Parrot

Batak Woman with Parrot ~ 1911

Batak Woman with Parrot ~ 1911

Batak is a collective term used to identify a number of ethnic groups predominantly found in North Sumatra, Indonesia. The term is used to include the Alas, Kluet, Singkil, Karo, Pakpak, Simalungun, Toba, Angkola, and Mandailing which are distinct but related groups with distinct, albeit related, languages and customs (adat).

In North Sumatra, Toba people typically assert their identity as 'Batak', while other 'Bataks' may explicitly reject that label, preferring instead to identify as specifically 'Simalungun', 'Karo', etc

Kali Pintoe Ketjil


Kleine Poort is the name that was used to refer to the Jl. Pintu Kecil (Small Door street). Pintu Kecil name derived from the name of the door to get into the fortress of Batavia. Pintu Kecil becomes an alternative way for those who are going into or out of the city walls. Because the main door which are Buiten Nieuwpoort and Binnen Straat (now Jalan Pintu Besar Utara and Pintu Besar Selatan) was closed at night to prevent attacks from Banten Sultanate army. Pintu Kecil is located on the south side of the city walls. The door was, according to some historical sources, situated near Diest Bastion. No wonder if the Pintu Kecil also mention as Diestpoort (Diest Gate)


The location of Pintu Kecil is not far from the Great River. Formerly at this location there were so much Chinese architecture buildings. At the present time, the buildings have already vanished. After the “rebellion” from the Chinese in October 1840, VOC ban the Chinese people dwelt inside the fort. Pintu Kecil including Glodok become the Chinese Camp. The VOC made this area as a tool to monitor the Chinese in Batavia

Since the beginning of the 20th century, Pintu Kecil has been transformed into a center of trade and business of the Chinese. At that time Pintu Kecil had become the Batavia Wallstreet. Pintu Kecil at the present time more easily recognized as a street to Asemka or Pasar Pagi (Morning Market). In this Pintu Kecil, the textile merchants also gathered because this region is a center for textile wholesaler. It is said that until the 1970s – when the business and trade is still based in the Jakarta Kota, this was the place where the circulation of money.

Masked Dancer

Masked men of the theater acting in Topéing, Java, Indonesia [between 1900 and 1923]
Masked men of the theater acting in Topéing, Java, Indonesia [between 1900 and 1923]

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